Are Bananas Are Safe For People With Hypertension?

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

high blood pressure

Are Bananas Are Safe For People With Hypertension? – Just No High Blood Pressure

Bananas Stabilize The Sugar Levels

Latest on our Just No High Blood Pressure Newsletter:

Electronic Blood Pressure Monitors Can Provide More Accuracy Than Older Devices

Also, Patients Require Relaxing 15 Minutes Before Measurement

Immune Cells Help Control High Blood Pressure And Type 2 Diabetes

Obesity Decreases The Number Of Immune Cells Related To Hypertension Control

Orange Juice Has Health Benefits, But Beware Of Excess Sugar

Orange Juice Has Flavonoids And Antioxidants Along With Vitamin C

These Foods Have Components That Reduce Hypertension

They Widen And Relax The Arteries

Exercise Can Worsen High Blood Pressure In Certain Cases

If You Have Excessive Hypertension, Beware Of Strong Workouts

Honking Won’t Make Traffic Run Faster And It Will Raise Your Blood Pressure

Honking Leads To Anxiety And High Blood Pressure

Fatty Liver Can Lead To Diabetes And Hypertension – Learn How It Can Be Reversed

Lowering Fat Ingestion And Lemon Water Will Help

These Foods Will Make You Live Longer

Amazing Properties Of Chili Peppers

Avoiding Chronic Kidney Disease

Kidneys May Be Working Excessively – Learn How To Unburden Them

Are Bananas Are Safe For People With Hypertension?

Bananas Stabilize The Sugar Levels

You can also have the latest information on High Blood Pressure.

Every subscription includes a bonus E-Book on High Blood Pressure, completely FREE.

Subscribe now, and you will access to an additional Health Newsletter and also download its free E-Book. Choose between other health conditions, such as:

  • Acid Reflux
  • Anxiety
  • Back Pain
  • Bad Breath
  • Hair Loss
  • Headache
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Insomnia
  • Snoring
  • Tinnitus

The additional newsletter is ideal for a friend or family member suffering from one of these conditions. Remember that you will get this newsletter completely FREE with your subscription.

For ONE subscription you will receive:

  • Our HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE NEWSLETTER
  • One ADDITIONAL NEWSLETTER ON ANOTHER HEALTH CONDITION, ideal for a friend or family member
  • One BONUS E-BOOK ON HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE and one E-BOOK on the HEALTH CONDITION you selected, COMPLETELY FREE

With ONE subscription you will receive TWO newsletters and TWO Bonus E-Books. Get Access Here.

Already subscribed? Login Here

Just No High Blood Pressure

Advertisements

High Blood Pressure Newsletter – New This Week – W04-05 – 2017

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

high blood pressureJust No High Blood Pressure Newsletter – Weeks 04-05 –  2007

This week we have interesting info: Did you know that high blood pressure will be able to be controlled without meds, using implantable devices? Also, new wearable device will allow continuous blood pressure monitoring, low blood pressure may increase the risk on a heart attack, learning the pros and cons of taking diuretics, caffeine reduces inflammation of age-related diseases and could slow aging, how to identify the symptoms of hypertension, shoulder problems related to cardiovascular disease, risk factors leading to sudden cardiac death, depression related to heart conditions, genetic causes of hypertension, benefits of flavonoids for weight loss and lowering hypertension, and more.

Subscribe to our newsletter and download our FREE E-Book on High Blood Pressure. And if you subscribe now, you can also access another Health Newsletter and also download its free E-Book. For ONE subscription you will receive TWO HEALTH NEWSLETTERS plus TWO E-BOOKS. More info? Click here.

high blood pressure

High Blood Pressure Newsletter – New This Week – W02-03 – 2017

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

high blood pressureJust No High Blood Pressure Newsletter – Weeks 02-03 –  2007

This week we have interesting info: Did you know that, as strange as it sounds, in older adults, hypertension could be beneficial for the brain? Also, how to avoid child hypertension, an enzyme that can treat obesity and diabetes, excess body fat responsible for serious health conditions, stress and anxiety increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, limiting excess sodium intake, excess weight reduces the life expectancy in obese people, software based on artificial intelligence can predict mortality in heart disease patients, caffeine can help reduce inflammation in old age and also increase longevity, new blood pressure monitor with the size of a smartwatch, what are brain aneurysms, and more.

Subscribe to our newsletter and download our FREE E-Book on High Blood Pressure. And if you subscribe now, you can also access another Health Newsletter and also download its free E-Book. For ONE subscription you will receive TWO HEALTH NEWSLETTERS plus TWO E-BOOKS. More info? Click here.

high blood pressure

Obesity prevention programs might help lower kids’ blood pressure

Tags

,

By Shereen Jegtvig

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Programs designed to prevent obesity in children may help lower kids’ blood pressure, according to a new review of past studies.
Researchers found that programs targeting both diet and physical activity were more effective than programs that focused on one or the other.
Although it’s generally thought of as a disease of middle-aged and elderly people, children can also develop high blood pressure, or hypertension. The American Heart Association recommends that children have yearly blood pressure checks, saying that detecting high blood pressure early will improve a child’s health.
Dr. Bonita Falkner told Reuters Health that in the U.S., at least 3.5 percent of children and adolescents have hypertension and another 3.5 percent are at risk because of slightly elevated blood pressure.
Falkner studies hypertension at Jefferson Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia and was not involved in the new review.
High blood pressure is more common among children who are overweight and obese, so the authors of the review wanted to see if obesity-prevention programs also improved blood pressure in kids.
“Blood pressure during childhood can track into adulthood, and when kids have elevated blood pressure they are more likely to have hypertension when they become adults,” coauthor Dr. Youfa Wang told Reuters Health in an email.
Wang, from the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, said the new review is part of a larger comprehensive study on childhood obesity funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The project also includes researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.
Wang and his colleagues analyzed data from 23 studies of obesity interventions, including almost 19,000 kids in total. The interventions targeted diet, physical activity or both and lasted at least one year, or six months for school-based programs.
Studies compared children who received a particular intervention with those who did not. In the majority of studies, children were randomly assigned to go through the obesity-prevention program or to be in a comparison group.
The 23 studies tested a total of 28 different interventions. Most of them were done in schools or in combined school and home settings.
Four of the interventions showed positive effects on both body fat and blood pressure. Eleven suggested a beneficial effect on blood pressure, but no effect on body fat.
Wang and his colleagues then combined the findings of 19 studies that reported on systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) and 18 that reported on diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number).
They found that obesity prevention programs reduced blood pressure among children, by an average of 1.64 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) in systolic blood pressure and 1.44 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure.
The reduction was more pronounced in the studies that used a combined approach with both diet and physical activity interventions, the authors wrote in Circulation.
“It’s not a huge impact, but the totality of the data that they looked at with the analysis of multiple projects seemed to be optimistic,” Falkner said.
“So it’s hopeful that some impact can be achieved,” she said. “No one really lost a lot of weight but at least with the efforts there was some decrease in blood pressure.”
Falkner said measuring blood pressure has become a standard part of children’s medical care, just like measuring height and weight. But deciding what’s normal and what’s high blood pressure is more complicated than it is in adults.
“In adults, generally, there is an accepted standard of 140/90 (mm Hg), which is the cut-off point,” she said. “If blood pressure goes beyond that it becomes a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases.”
For kids, on the other hand, assessments are based on how their blood pressure compares to other children of their age, height and gender.
Treatment depends on how high the blood pressure is, Falkner said.
“If it’s markedly elevated then the doctors generally do some testing to see if there’s some underlying cause for the high blood pressure,” she said.
She said there are things parents can do that are beneficial for kids’ blood pressure, such as helping them lose weight if they’re overweight or obese.
Dietary changes such as reducing sodium or following the DASH diet could help, she added. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension.
“The DASH diet is kind of like the Mediterranean diet,” Falkner said. “It’s rich in fruits and vegetables, fiber and low-fat dairy.”
“The idea behind this is that there are multiple nutrients that are beneficial for the cardiovascular system,” she said.
SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1j1j3Gy Circulation, online February 19, 2014.

Health
Disease & Medical Conditions
blood pressure
high blood pressure

Read more …